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AFRL TO #3 - Modeling of High Current Loading of Carbon Nanomembranes: Simulation of the Electrical and Thermal Behavior
Objective and Background
The proposed research seeks provide insight into the behavior and properties of carbon nanomembranes, aVoltage within a carbon nanotube thin film macro-scale network of neat single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT), by developing computational simulations that stochastically incorporate the network nanostructure to understand the membrane’s response to electrical loadings. In particular the AFRL/RXBC seeks to establish the fundamental link between the stochastic nature of the nanostructure and the bulk response of the network, and how this coupling affects the damage mechanisms under large current loading. The proposed work will incorporate our recent successes in developing the simulation software suite for electrical conductivity predictions and recent work in thermal conductivity predictions of nanomembranes, and advance the existing capability in several key areas, (1) a fully 3-D network, (2) coupling thermal and electrical effects, (3) study steady-state and transient responses for a variety of nanostructure configurations, (4) provide insight into damage mechanisms, and (5) study the effects of adding a polymer matrix. This project will seek to predict the conductivity in a manner that can only be satisfied through large scale stochastic computations due to the consideration of the full length scale range for each of the relevant physical phenomena and parameters involved in nanotube conducting networks. The models developed will be generic enough such that they can be applied to study the conductivity of the bulk material for a variety of different nanostructures as expected from variations in processing conditions.
Parameters effecting network conductivity
Developed Results
  • Developed quasi-static failure model for electrical current flow, and comparisons with data from the literature correspond quite well
  • From nanoscale simulation for the bulk conductivity, developed effective continuum representation of electricalThermal current flow between nanotubes conductivity as a function of current density, and validated the results from a fully 3D finite elementmodel with experimental results in the literature
  • Incorporated MD results for seperation distance into the electrical and thermal conductivity simulations
  • Developed a fully three dimensional physics based computational model to study the thermal and the electrical conductivity
Publications From This Work
  • CNT Thin Film Network Failure Due to Concentrated Current Loadings. D.A. Jack*. Proceedings of ASME IMECE'11, Denver, Colorado, November, 2011.
  • Parametric Study of Nanostructure Variations on the Macroscopic Thermal and Electrical Behavior of Neat CNT Thin Film Networks. N. Ashtekar* and D.A. Jack. Proceedings of ASME IMECE'11, Denver, Colorado, November, 2011, Abstract accepted, publication in preparation.
  • Investigation of Thermal and Electrical Behavior of a Neat CNT Thin Film Networks Using 3D Computational Model. N. Ashtekar* and D.A. Jack. Early Career Technical Conference, Fayetteville, Arkansas, March 2011.
  • Stochastic Modeling of the Bulk Thermal Conductivity for Dense Carbon Nanotube Networks. N. Ashtekar and D.A. Jack. Manuscript submitted to Journal of Heat Transfer, 2010.
  • Parametric Study of Thermal and Electrical Behavior of 3-D CNT Thin Film Networks. N. Ashtekar* and D.A. Jack. Proceedings of ASME IMECE'10, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, November, 2010.
  • Modeling the Bulk Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Characteristics for Thin Film Carbon Nanomembranes. N. Ashtekar* and D.A. Jack. Early Career Technical Conference, Tulsa, Oklahoma, March 2010.
  • Stochastic Modeling of the Bulk Thermal Conductivity for Dense Carbon Nanotube Networks. N. Ashtekar* and D.A. Jack. Proceedings of ASME IMECE'09, Orlando, Florida, November, 2009.
Baylor University School of Engineering and Computer Science Department of Mechanical Engineering Sic'Em - Scientific Innovations in Composites and Engineering Materials